Second Section of Standard Simplified 24 Form Taijiquan (Yang Style) Movements 6 – 9

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Second Section of Standard Simplified 24 Form Taijiquan (Yang Style)
Movements 6 – 9

6. Step Back and Repulse Monkey

Variations of names for this movement include: Fending Off the Monkey; Step Back to Drive the Monkey Away; Repulse Monkey and Step Back;
Step Back and Swirl Your Arms; Reverse Reeling Forearm (Daojuan Gong), Step Back and Drive Monkey Away, Repulse Monkey, 倒撵猴 : Dao Nian Hou.

The Direction of Movement is reversed. Move backward in a straight line from W9 in the direction of E3. Please study the recommended online videos to see how the series of postures in this particular movement are performed.


6a = 5d. Right leg and right twisting (reverse reeling forearm) arm back, left arm forward, step back with left leg (6d), exchange arms and move right palm forward (6d-6e).
Left leg and leg twisting arm back, right arm forward, step back with right leg (6g), exchange arms and move left palm forward (6g-6h). 6h = 6i.
Right leg and right twisting arm back, left arm forward, step back with left leg (6k), exchange arms and move right palm forward (6k-6l).
Left leg and leg twisting arm back, right arm forward, step back with right leg (6n), exchange arms and move left palm forward (6n-6o).

Here is a detailed description of how to perform Repulse Monkey (#6, 6a-60) taken from the very useful narrative document by David Hann:

“Repulse Monkey (1): Turn your right hand palm up and let it drop so that your arm moves in an arc (6a-6b). Continue bringing your right arm back until your hand is level with your right shoulder (6c). Turn your left hand palm up and flat, parallel with the earth (6c). Notice that your torso is facing (6c) to the side (N12) (the same direction as you face when you first begin, Raising the Chi (1a). Step back with the left foot (6d-6e), taking care to maintain your stance about a two fist width from your right foot, or about shoulder width. Now turn your torso to the left, bringing your right arm forward in a palm strike and your left arm backward as if grabbing an opponent’s arm and pulling (6d-63). Your right palm will now be the most advanced hand (6e).
Repulse Monkey (2): Turn your left hand palm up and let it drop so that your arm moves in an arc (6e-6f). Continue bringing your left arm back until your hand is level with your left shoulder (6g). Turn your right hand palm up and flat, parallel with the earth (6f). Notice that your torso is facing to the opposite side (S6). Step back with the right foot, taking care to maintain your stance about a two fist width from your left foot, or about shoulder width (6g-6h). Now turn your torso to the right, bringing your left arm forward in a palm strike and your right arm backward as if grabbing an opponent’s arm and pulling (6h). Your left palm will now be the most advanced hand (6h).
Repulse Monkey (3): Turn your right hand palm up and let it drop so that your arm moves in an arc (6i). Continue bringing your right arm back until your hand is level with your right shoulder (6j). Turn your left hand palm up and flat, parallel with the earth (6j). Notice that your torso is facing (N12) to the side (the same direction as you face when you first begin, Raising the Chi. Step back with the left foot, taking care to maintain your stance about a two fist width from your right foot, or about shoulder width (6k-6l). Now turn your torso to the left, bringing your right arm forward in a palm strike and your left arm backward as if grabbing an opponent’s arm and pulling (6l). Your right palm will now be the most advanced hand (6l).
Repulse Monkey (4): Turn your left hand palm up and let it drop so that your arm moves in an arc (6l-6m). Continue bringing your left arm back until your hand is level with your left shoulder (6m). Turn your right hand palm up and flat, parallel with the earth(6m). Notice that your torso is facing to the opposite side (S6). Step back with the left foot, taking care to maintain your stance about a two fist width from your right foot, or about shoulder width (6n-6o). Now turn your torso to the right, bringing your left arm forward in a palm strike and your right arm backward as if grabbing an opponent’s arm and pulling (6n-6o). Your left palm will now be the most advanced hand (6o).”
– David Hann, Yang Style Short Form Tai Chi

7. Grasping the Sparrow’s Tail – Left

Variations of names for this movement include: Grasp the Sparrow’s Tail, Grasping the Peacock’s Tail, Grasp the Bird’s Tail, Four Gates, Grasp the Sparrow’s Tail to the Left Side, Hold the Peacock’s Tail, 拦雀尾左 : Lan Que Wei Zou : Grasp the Bird’s Tail Left.

“Grasping the Bird’s Tail” is the most frequently occurring movement in the Yang Style Long 108 Form. This movement consists of four parts: Ward Off, Roll Back, Press and Push.

The general direction of movement is in a straight line from E3 towards W9 in Movement #7. Please study the recommended online videos to see how the series of postures in this particular movement are performed.


7a = 6o. Generally, one is moving in the direction of W9, to your left side, in Movement 7.

Here is a detailed description of how to perform Grasping the Bird’s Tail, Left Mode (#7, 7a-7m) taken from the book “Illustrations of Tai Chi Chuan Simplified” by Y. W. Chong, pp. 27-31:

“1. Raise the left hand arch-wise to the right (7a-7b) and stop it before the right side of the waist (7c). At the same time bend the right hand horizontally before the chest as if grasping a ball with both hands (7c). Concurrently draw the left foot back and put it close to the right one (7b-7c), with the left toes touching the ground (7c).
2. Lift the left hand outward in a bent manner to the left as if to ward off a blow (7c-7e) and bow it horizontally at the level of the shoulders (7e). At the same time swing the right hand downward to the right (7d-7e) and put it beside the right thigh (7e). At the same time stretch the left foot out and bow it forward (7d-7e). The eyes are looking at the left forearm (7e). [Ward Off Left (Peng Zuo) I]
3. Stretch the left hand forward, turning its palm downward (7f). Concurrently turn the right palm upward and stretch it forward until it comes below the left wrist (7f). Then pull the two hands downward past the abdomen and swing them up backward to the right until the right hand comes to the height of the shoulders with its palm upward (7f-7g) and the left hand comes before the chest with its palm facing inward and the elbow bend horizontally (7g). At the same time shift the centre of gravity to the right foot (7g). The eyes are looking at the right hand (7g). [Roll Back (Lu) II]
4. Draw the right hand back and put it at the inside of the left wrist (7g). Push both hands forward with the left palm inward and the right one outward (7h-7i). At the same time bow the left leg forward (7h-7i). The eyes are looking at the left wrist (7i). [Press (Ji) III]
5. Separate both hands at the distance of the breadth across the shoulders with both palms facing downward (7j-7k). Then lower the upper body slightly backwards (7k), shifting the centre of gravity to the right foot (7k). At the same time draw both hands back to the two sides of the waist with both palms facing forward slightly to the ground (7k-7l). The eyes are looking forward horizontally (7l).
6. Push both hands forward and upward (7l-7m). At the same time bow the left leg forward (7m). The eyes are looking forward. [Push (An) IV]”
– Y. W. Chong

I. Ward Off Left (Peng Zuo) (7b-7e) Inhale 7b-7c, and exhale 7d-7e. Turn torso to the left towards W9 (7e).

II. Roll Back (Lu) (7f-7g) Inhale 7e-7g. Turn torso to right towards N12 (7g). The hand movements for Roll Back are not shown clearly in the the above illustrations (7f-7g). Look at right hand in the direction of NE2.

III. Press (Ji) (7h-7i) Inhale 7g-7h, and exhale 7h-7i. Torso facing W9 (7i). Turn torso to the left towards W9 (7i). The right palm presses against the left forearm. The left palm faces the body.

IV. Push (An) (7j-7m) Face W9. Push both hands, palms forward, towards W9 (7m). Inhale 7j-7l, and exhale 7l-7m. Torso faces W9 (7m).

(7e) (7i) (7m) (7m)

8. Grasping the Sparrow’s Tail – Right

Variations of names for this movement include: Grasp the Sparrow’s Tail, Grasp the Bird’s Tail, Four Gates, Grasp the Sparrow’s Tail to the Right Side, Hold the Peacock’s Tail, 拦雀尾右: Lan Que Wei You : Grasp the Bird’s Tail Right.

The general direction of movement is in a straight line from W9 towards E3 in Movement #8. Please study the recommended online videos to see how the series of postures in this particular movement are performed.

“Grasping the Bird’s Tail” is the most frequently occurring movement in the Yang Style Long 108 Form. This movement consists of four parts: Ward Off, Roll Back, Press and Push.


8a = 7m. Generally, one is moving in the direction of E3, to your right side, in Movement 8.

Here is a detailed description of how to perform Grasping the Sparrow’s Tail – Right (#8, 8a-8o) taken from the book “Tai Chi Ch’uan and Qigong: Techniques and Training” by Wolfgang Metzger and Peifang Zhou, pp. 106-109:

“Assume starting position (8a = 7m): Arch steps to the left. Left foot load about 70 percent; right foot about 30 percent (8a). Shift weight to the right foot; left foot rotates on the heel by 90° to 120° to the inside (8b). At the same time – with gently held, slightly rounded arms – the hands move with the upper body to the right (8b). Slowly bend arms, with right hand moving in an upward arc (8b-8c), and assume the ball-holding position in front of the right side of the body (8c-8d). While in the ball-holding position, the right foot is pulled towards the left without the toes touching the ground (8d).
1. Peng Movement: With an arched step to the right, pull the left hand as in Form 2 (“Parting Horse’s Mane”) in an arc down to hip level (8e-8f), while the right forearm – different from Form 2 – moves at a left angle in an arc forward and up (8e-8f) until level with the chest (8f), harmoniously coordinating it with the rotation of the body (8d-8f) and the shifting of the weight (8e-8f). Position (8f) is the starting point for the second part of this form. [Ward Off Right (Peng You) I]
2. Lu Movement: This starts with a slight rotation of the body to the right SE4 (8g), not shown in the illustration. While the body rotates to the right, hands are rotating to face each other, the right hand moving towards the right. Both hands – while shifting the weight to the left leg (8f-8g) and rotating the body to NW11 – move in an arc down to the right hip level (8g). [Roll Back (Lu) II]
3. Ji Movement: Preceded by a small reaching back movement (8h), move the left hand towards the left; both hands cross at the wrists and are pushed forward and out (8i-8k). When pushing forward, shift the weight again to the right leg (8k). [Press (Ji) III]
4. An Movement: at the conclusion of the Ji movement (8k), turn the hands so that they are crossed (8l) with the palms facing down, right hand below the left (8l). As the weight is shifted to the back left leg (8m-8n) – the toes of the right foot raised slightly off the ground (8n) – the crossed hands separate again and are pulled towards the body by the elbows (8m-8n). They are then – with a slight shift of of the body’s weight (8n-8o) – pushed forward (8n-8o). Do not straighten your arms out in the end position (8o). [Push (An) IV].”
– Wolfgang Metzger and Peifang Zhou

I. Ward Off Right (Peng You) (8a-8f) Inhale 8c-8d, and exhale 8e-8f. Turn torso to the right towards E3 (8c-8e).

II. Roll Back (Lu) (8f-8h) Inhale 8g-8h. Turn torso to right towards N12 (8h). The hand movements for Roll Back are not shown clearly in the the above illustrations (8f-8h). Look at right hand in the direction of NW10.

III. Press (Ji) (8j-8k) Inhale 8h-8i, and exhale 8j-8k. Torso facing E3 (8k). Turn torso to the right towards E3 (8i-8k). The left wrist presses against the inside of the right forearm. The right palm faces the body.

IV. Push (An) (8l-8o) Push both hands, palms forward, towards E3 (8n-8o). Inhale 8m-8n, and exhale 8n-8o. Torso faces E3 (8o). Both palms face away from the body.

(8f) (8k) (8k)

9. Single Whip

Variations of names for this movement include: Simple Whip, Whip, Holding the Whip in One Hand, Holding a Single Whip, 单鞭 : Dan Bian.

The general direction of movement is in a straight line from E3 towards W9 in Movement #9.

From the Push phase (9a) at the end of the Grasping the Sparrow’s Tail movement (9a = 8o), begin to rotate the arms from the left side to the right side. The arms draw across the body at about chest height (9a-9c). After the arms reach the left side (9c), then they rotate back to the right side (9c-9d). The waist faces N12 (9c). As the right arm gets to the right side (9d) then the hand extends in the direction of NE1 (9e) and the hand is shaped into a beak style (thumb touches the other fingers and all fingers point down) (9e). The left arm is drawn up to the face level, with the palm facing the face (9e). As the right hand forms into beak, the left leg steps to the right, bringing the left foot fairly close to the right foot (9d-9e), and the left toe touching the ground (9e). As the left leg lifts and is placed to face W9, the left hand opens out towards W9 (9e-9f). As the body settles into a left bow stance (9g), the left hand pushes forward, palm facing out. We end in Single Whip (9g) with the waist facing NW11, in a left bow stance, pushing with the left palm in the direction of W9, with the right arm lifted and pointing towards NE1, beaked right hand, and looking towards W9 (9g). Inhale 9d-9e, and exhale 9f-9g.

(9g) (9g)

Return to Index for Sections or Proceed to Third Section (Movements 10 – 15)

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